Leonid Pavlov: Collected Works

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Leonid Pavlov: Collected Works
Leonid Pavlov: Collected Works
Video: Leonid Pavlov: Collected Works
Video: DeepHack RL — Михаил Павлов (5vision) 2023, February
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Leonid Pavlov [27.7 (9.8).1909 - 18.9.1990] is a unique figure in the history of Soviet architecture: having started his path at the icon-painting school in Mstera, he continued it at the art workers' faculty, and then at VKHUTEMAS, where he met Ivan Leonidov, forever which became his "creative conscience". The turn from the avant-garde to the classics in the 1930s did not come as a shock for the architect, then he entered the graduate school of the Academy of Architecture, where he studied with Alexei Shchusev and Ivan Zholtovsky. As a result, Pavlov managed to harmoniously combine in his work such multidirectional and seemingly contradictory schools.

Pavlov's projects are likewise not limited to any one area. For 60 years of practice, he managed to work in all possible areas: from administrative and entertainment complexes to sports and transport facilities, not to mention numerous projects of residential buildings, the famous "collection" of computing centers and a not so successful series of buildings for servicing cars. … From the beginning of the 30s until the very end of the USSR, there was no such period in the life of Leonid Pavlov in which he would not have been able to create high-quality modern architecture.

1. Metro station "Dobryninskaya"

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Станция метро «Добрынинская» Фото © Константин Антипин
Станция метро «Добрынинская» Фото © Константин Антипин
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Architects: L.N. Pavlov, M.A. Zelenin, M.A. Ilyin

With the participation of the architect: Ya.V. Tatarzhinskaya

Design engineers: A.I. Semenov, L.I. Gorelik, A.N. Pirozhkova

Miniature reliefs at the station: sculptor E.A. Janson-Manizer

Mosaic panels in the lobby: artists G.I. Rublev and B.V. Jordan

Start of design: 1943

Station opening: 1950

Moscow, metro station "Dobryninskaya"

In the ensemble of screaming luxury of the Moscow Metro's Circle Line, Dobryninskaya looks like a guest from the postmodern future. The art critic Mikhail Ilyin, a specialist in Russian medieval architecture, helped Pavlov to design the station. Gradually minimizing the amount of detail, Pavlov came to a laconic image of an arcade with arches of different scales. This image was supposed to be reflected in the architecture of the ground lobby, but politics intervened.

At a speech at the House of Architects, Pavlov spoke out in defense of one of his teachers - Ivan Zholtovsky, accused of formalism. The defense gradually developed into an attack on the chief architect of Moscow in those years, Dmitry Chechulin. Calling the box office pavilion of the Kievsky railway station, designed by him, "an architectural cacophony", Pavlov lost his job at the Moscow Architectural Institute, and then was removed from the design of a metro station already under construction. As a result, the ground lobby of the station was thought out without his participation by the architect Mikhail Zelenin.

But by the time the station opened in 1950, Moscow had a new chief architect - Alexander Vlasov. Pavlov, who had recently gone to work on the development of Sevastopol, was able to return to the capital, where he immediately took up the planning and development of the South-West. Soon, Soviet architecture was awaited by a decree "on the fight against excesses" and a new stage of creative searches, during which Pavlov, who went through the school of VKHUTEMAS, called for inspiration to the heritage of the avant-garde.

2. Research Institute of Fire Automation

НИИ пожарной автоматики Фото © Константин Антипин
НИИ пожарной автоматики Фото © Константин Антипин
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    1/3 Research Institute of Fire Automation Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/3 Research Institute of Fire Automation Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/3 Scientific Research Institute of Fire Automation Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Design and build: 1960s

Moscow, 1st Mytishchinskaya street, building 3, building 1

A monumental, almost sculptural composition: a glass parallelepiped sliding between two rough brick plates. The building of the institute stands right next to the railway, which determined its dynamic appearance.A decade and a half later, Pavlov will return to this image when designing a pavilion for V.I. Lenin near the Paveletsky railway station. Unfortunately, Russian Railways disfigured the image of this pavilion during its reconstruction as a museum of the Moscow Railway.

3. Research Institute of Vacuum Technology named after S.A. Vekshinsky

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    1/5 Research Institute of Vacuum Technology named after S.A. Vekshinsky Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/5 Research Institute of Vacuum Technology named after S.A. Vekshinsky Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/5 Research Institute of Vacuum Technology named after S.A. Vekshinsky Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/5 Research Institute of Vacuum Technology named after S.A. Vekshinsky Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    5/5 Research Institute of Vacuum Technology named after S.A. Vekshinsky Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Completion of construction: 1967

Moscow, Nagorny proezd, house 7

Another institute in the style of early modernism with its abundance of glass and simple geometric forms, designed by Pavlov in the same years. Here, three different-scale parallelepipeds are neatly inscribed in the development of the industrial zone at the intersection of the Small Ring and the Paveletsky direction of the Moscow Railway. Today, inside the building with a volume of more than 300 cubic meters, there are many enterprises of different directions, tall trees have grown around, and you can fully understand the plan only by climbing several tens of meters above the building.

4. Central Economics and Mathematics Institute

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    1/4 Central Economics and Mathematics Institute Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/4 Central Economics and Mathematics Institute Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/4 Central Economics and Mathematics Institute Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/4 Central Economics and Mathematics Institute Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, I. Ya. Yadrov, G.V. Kolycheva, G. D. Dembovskaya

Engineers: E.B. Garmsen, L.A. Muromtsev, V.A. Averbukh, R.A. Rohvarger

Artists: V.K. Vasiltsov, E.A. Zharyonova

Project: 1966

Completion of construction: 1978

Sculpture "Mobius Leaf" on the facade: 1975

Moscow, Nakhimovsky prospect, 47

In the era of the conquest of space, Pavlov did not betray Zholtovsky's school, continuing the design of buildings along the path of harmonizing all values ​​and subordinating their composition to a special proportional order. And yet, if in the works of the Stalinist period Pavlov was looking for national identity, referring to the motives of the old Russian architecture, now he is inspired by the avant-garde and operates with cosmic values ​​in his works. Pavlov laid a square in the basis of the composition of the building of TsEMI. The basis of the proportional scheme for the sizes of the sides of the square, Pavlov put the radius of the Earth.

The first square - the legendary monumental composition above the entrance to the building - has a side length of 13 meters, or one millionth of the planet's diameter, that is, its two radii. The second square is a plate with a side one hundred thousand times smaller than the radius of the earth - this part of the building was intended to accommodate computers, which occupied huge areas in the 60s. And the third square is a plate with a side length 1/10 larger than the previous one, while shifted relative to it. The result is a powerful three-part composition of the building, composed of a block for people, a block for cars and monumental art.

Unfortunately, Pavlov's idea was not destined to come true in full. The protracted construction of the building and the simultaneous development of computer technology have led to the disappearance of the need for such large areas for it. As a result, in the premises designed "for cars", additional offices were organized for the staff of the institute. Nowadays, the unity of the architectural ensemble of scientific institutes on Profsoyuznaya, conceived in the 60s, was destroyed first by the interventions of residential complexes in the space between them, and then by fire, which led to the demolition of the INION building.

5. Computing Center of the State Planning Commission

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Вычислительный центр Госплана Фото © Константин Антипин
Вычислительный центр Госплана Фото © Константин Антипин
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Architects: L.N. Pavlov, L.Yu. Gonchar, A.P. Semenov, O.A. Trubnikova

Design: 1966-1967

Completion of construction: 1974

Moscow, Akademika Sakharov Avenue, 12

In 1962, Pavlov designed a new building for the State Planning Commission, which received recognition in the creative environment and a positive assessment from the department. So a few years later, when the State Planning Committee needed a building for its computing center, Pavlov was again involved in the work. Even during his studies at VKHUTEMAS Pavlov was worried about the question: "How to make a monumental structure?" The answer to it, received from Vladimir Tatlin, seems to have forever determined the direction of Pavlov's creative thought:

“Take a square plus one inch! The square is "all the same", the square is death. The movement should begin, just begin. A small shift, the beginning of the dynamics, the origin of the movement, the birth …"

A dynamic versatile cube of a computing center, based on four "adimaripa", between which a thin plate of stylobate is threaded, is a structure generated by three eras: avant-garde, mastering the classics and "cosmism" of the 60s. The 42-meter side of the cube is not an allusion to The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Pavlov arrived at this value by dividing the circumference of the Earth by a million and slightly adjusting the answer to the product of two close numbers: 6 and 7. Subordinating all the values ​​of the composition to the proportions of the golden section, Pavlov obtained an image that combines the dynamics of the "irregular" cube and the statics of a flat stylobate …

6. Computing Center of the Central Statistical Bureau

Вычислительный центр Центрального статистического управления Фото © Константин Антипин
Вычислительный центр Центрального статистического управления Фото © Константин Антипин
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    1/3 Computing Center of the Central Statistical Bureau Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/3 Computing Center of the Central Statistical Bureau Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/3 Computing Center of the Central Statistical Office Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, T. Andlerova, A.V. Lunev, A.P. Semenov, P.E. Etlina, Engineers: E.B. Garmsen, G. Lysenko, V. Sobolev

Project: 1968

Completion of construction: 1980

Moscow, Izmailovskoe shosse, 44

In 1970, a population census was planned in the USSR. For these purposes, the CSO decided to build a computing center on the Izmailovskoye highway. Prior to that, Pavlov was engaged in the design of a computer center for Ivanovo, where on a thin horizontal square plate he placed a small cubic block of information storage and a high-rise volume containing rooms for people and cars. The project was not implemented, but its concept formed the basis for work on a new order. First of all, the shape of the stylobate plate stretched out, since, unlike the one located on the bridge square in Ivanovo, the site for the exhibition center in Izmailovo did not rest against the intersection of the highway with any other artery. Then they had to get rid of the cube, since in the several years that have passed since the beginning of the design, computer technology has managed to develop and fit into only one high-rise volume.

If in CEMI the spaces for people and machines were located next to each other and they were supposed to exist, as it were, in parallel, then in the CCCS Pavlov placed them one above the other in the same volume, indicating their heterogeneity by the difference in the pitch and thickness of the glazing strips. The articulation of the two volumes is emphasized by a powerful blind belt and two paired walls protruding from it perpendicularly, evoking many associations in the audience, but not carrying a functional load.

7. Demonstration service station for passenger cars on Varshavskoe highway

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    1/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    5/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    6/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    7/7 Demonstration car service station on Varshavskoe highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, L.Yu. Gonchar, E.S. Kopeliovich, R.E. Devil, V. Lebedev, S. Geller

together with: G. D. Dembovskaya

Engineers: E.B. Garmsen, A.S. Lesnevsky, V.P. Trostin

with the participation of L.A. Muromtsev, V. Sergeeva

Artists: V.K. Vasiltsov, E.A. Zharenova

Metal structures of the triangular part

Engineers: N.Ya. Bulkin, V.V. Zhdanov

Design: 1967-1968

Completion of construction: 1977

Moscow, Varshavskoe highway, 170G

The motorization that began in the USSR in the 60s, the increase in the production of budget small cars, including thanks to the construction of the Volga Automobile Plant in Togliatti, required the creation of infrastructure for servicing these cars: garages, gas stations and service stations. So, simultaneously with the design of "houses for machines" of computers, Pavlov is entrusted with the task of creating a complex of projects related to moving machines. The most striking, both on paper and in implementation, was the project of the Zhiguli passenger car service station on the Varshavskoe highway.

The colossal abstract composition consists of a horizontal plate with a garage and workshops for car maintenance and a triangular volume towering above it with a hall for their sale. From the hall, cars drove onto the street along a huge spiral ramp located in its center. The covering of the hall itself was originally supposed to be completely unsupported, but the organization that installed them did not cope with the task. Despite this, due to the abundance of light from all sides, the desired effect of "floating" the roof of the hall was still achieved. Outside, to the triangular image directed towards the Moscow Ring Road, metal triangles - "flaps" on the sides added spectacularity.

Neutralization station

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    1/4 Neutralization station Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/4 Neutralization station Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/4 Neutralization station Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/4 Neutralization station Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Artist: G.N. Beloyartseva-Weisberg

Moscow, Varshavskoe shosse, 170G, building 21

The neutralization station located near the service station deserves special attention. Three of its facades are covered with a huge mosaic panel by the artist Gabriela Beloyartseva-Weisberg - this is one of the last surviving works of monumental art on the territory of the workshop. Together with artists Vladimir Vasiltsov and Eleonora Zharenova, who created, for example, the famous "ear" on the facade of the Central Economic Institute, Leonid Pavlov planned to decorate a huge panel on the history of the transport of the wall along the spiral ramp, and a huge chandelier designed by Pavel Shimes was supposed to descend through the center through the spiral … Neither one nor the other was realized, and many created works have been lost by now.

8. Service station for cars "Moskvich" on the Minsk highway

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    1/6 Moskvich car service station on Minsk highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/6 Moskvich car service station on Minsk highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/6 Moskvich car service station on Minsk highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/6 Moskvich car service station on Minsk highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    5/6 Moskvich car service station on Minsk highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    6/6 Moskvich car service station on Minsk highway Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, L.Yu. Gonchar, R.E. Chertov, I. Zotova, G.D. Dembovskaya

Design start: 1968

Completion of construction: 1978

Moscow, Gorbunova street, house 14

The complex of service stations along the Moscow Ring Road was supposed to contain six such facilities.But already in the second, Pavlov began to have problems with the implementation of his own plans. Cars "Moskvich" were cheaper than "Zhiguli", so it was decided to save money for them at the service station. Initially, Pavlov created a project that strongly resembled a workshop in Varshavka, differing from him only in the shape of the showroom: it was supposed to be a square with four huge round windows on each of the four sides. After the refusal to move the showroom to the upper part of the complex, its volume shrank significantly towards the edge. All this strongly affected the image of the building, but it was finished off by saving on materials: the requirements for assembly and the use of standard parts led to a complete loss of connection with the original concept.

Like the workshop on Varshavskoe Shosse, the space of workshops and garages under a huge roof plane is illuminated here through several hundred light wells. But if, in the case of the demonstration station, experimental plexiglass domes were used, the active introduction of which began in the early 60s after the success of the Palace of Pioneers, then in this project it was necessary to resort to a more trivial solution. Sunlight enters through ordinary glass covered with a protective mesh on top.

The complex is still used practically for its intended purpose, only shifting and expanding its specialization from the products of the ruined AZLK plant to the cars of foreign concerns. For many years, the facades of the building were covered with advertising banners, but this year the complex underwent a renovation, during which its walls were faced with panels of a ventilated facade.

9. All-Union Scientific and Technical Information Center

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    1/3 All-Union Scientific and Technical Information Center Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/3 All-Union Scientific and Technical Information Center Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/3 All-Union Scientific and Technical Information Center Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, A.P. Semenov

Design and construction: late 1960s - early 1970s

Moscow, Smolnaya street, house 14

In the late 1960s, it was decided to build a building of the State Public Scientific and Technical Library in the public center of the Khimki-Khovrino district. Its design was carried out by a team from the GIPRONII Academy of Sciences headed by Valentin Kogan. Pavlov's workshop was instructed to tackle a more innovative task - the design of a scientific and technical information center, where microfilms and microfiches replaced the traditional library system for storing and issuing information on paper, for viewing which special devices were installed in the reading room. But the main thing that required the participation of Pavlov's workshop in this project was the presence of its own computing center in the complex.

As a result, the proportions of the high-rise part of the building exactly coincide with the “cube” of the Gosplan Computing Center, the only difference is in the way it is supported over the stylobate plate “threaded” under it: instead of four “adimarips”, only two supporting structures in the form of three petals remain. Unfortunately, the complex of buildings of the VNTIC already in the 1990s began to be used for other purposes: a trading house was located inside. Nowadays, it has changed its function again, becoming a business center. Recently, the main building underwent a major overhaul: the stylobate was faced with a ventilated facade, and the cube lost its original glazing pattern. The space between the former entrance to the plate and the cube support from the street side was glazed to organize the lobby, which also affected the loss of the dynamic image that Pavlov once laid.

10. Computing Center of the State Bank

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    1/4 Computing Center of the State Bank Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/4 Computing Center of the State Bank Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/4 Computing Center of the State Bank Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/4 Computing Center of the State Bank Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, A.P. Semenov

Design start: 1974

Completion of construction: 1996

Moscow, Svoboda street, house 57, building 1

Another computing center was designed by Pavlov in the early 1970s, and completed after his death.The image of a huge microcircuit completes the perspective of Khimki Boulevard and forms the facade of the Tushinsky District from the side of the reservoir. It is unlikely that Pavlov expected that the glazing would turn his building into a giant mirror, nevertheless, after a painfully long construction, the building began to be used for its intended purpose and still serves as the main computing center for the Central Bank of the Russian Federation.

11. Women's medical and labor dispensary

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    1/5 Women's medical and labor dispensary Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/5 Women's medical and labor dispensary Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/5 Women's medical and labor dispensary Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/5 Women's medical and labor dispensary Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    5/5 Women's medical and labor dispensary Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Project: 1978

Completion of construction: 1987

Moscow, Shosseinaya street, house 92

At first glance, the "unpopular" building in the depths of the Pechatniki occupies an important place in Pavlov's work. Here, located not far from the Nikolo-Perervinsky Monastery, his project, it seems, for the first time does not ignore the historical context, but conducts a dialogue with it. This does not mean Pavlov's complete rejection of the modernist attitude to heritage in his future projects, but sets the course in the direction of a careful attitude towards it. A few years after the opening, the dispensary was reorganized into a pre-trial detention center, another one grew up around the Pavlovsk "fortress", and a temple was organized in one of the towers, the cross of which adds another parallel to the image of the monastery.

12. Metro station "Serpukhovskaya"

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Станция метро «Серпуховская» Фото © Константин Антипин
Станция метро «Серпуховская» Фото © Константин Антипин
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Architects: L.N. Pavlov, N.A. Aleshina, L.Yu. Potter

Engineers: E.S. Barsky, Yu.Z. Muromtsev, Yu.B. Eisenberg, V.M. Pyatigorsk

Artists: L.A. Novikova, M.N. Alekseev

Station opening: 1983

Moscow, metro station "Serpukhovskaya"

Three decades after the opening of the Serpukhovskaya Metro Line, which was later renamed Dobryninskaya, Pavlov again took on the design of a metro station near Serpukhovskaya Square. In the architecture of the new station, the architect returns to historical motives: the name of the station on the track walls is decorated with reliefs with a letter and images on the Old Russian theme. In contrast to the semantic connection with the ancient Serpukhov, under the ceiling of the central hall of the station stretched a unique 60-meter slotted light guide, penetrating 12 cubes of anodized aluminum and symbolizing a beam directed towards the modern scientific center Pushchino.

Unfortunately, the "Pushchino ray" has not survived to this day, which greatly affected the perception of the architectural appearance of the station. The same fate befell the lighting inside the arches at Dobryninskaya. Perhaps these two losses are the most easily replenished among Pavlov's gigantic legacy.

13. Metro station "Nagatinskaya"

Станция метро «Нагатинская» Фото © Константин Антипин
Станция метро «Нагатинская» Фото © Константин Антипин
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    1/3 Metro station "Nagatinskaya" Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/3 Metro station "Nagatinskaya" Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/3 Metro station "Nagatinskaya" Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, L.Yu. Gonchar, I.G. Petukhova, A.P. Semenov, N.I. Shumakov

Engineer: T.B. Protserova

Artists: E.A. Zharenova, V.K. Vasiltsev

Station opening: 1983

Moscow, metro station "Nagatinskaya"

Pavlov thought to enrich the most laconic architectural image of a typical centipede station with a longitudinal or transverse arcade, but the design competition was won by the option with round columns and monumental panels on the entire wall. Ancient Russia again became the theme of the panel; the artists Eleonora Zharenova and Vladimir Vasiltsov made them using the Florentine mosaic technique. Coordination of images of a huge number of churches was given to Pavlov with great difficulty: the leadership insisted on changing the theme towards nature or science …

14. Computing center "Cascade"

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    1/3 Computing Center "Cascade" Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/3 Computing Center "Cascade" Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/3 Computing Center "Cascade" Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Completion of construction: 1983

Moscow, 1st Brestskaya street, 35

The last computing center in Pavlov's "collection" again, after the dispensary in Pechatniki, tells us about the Master's ability to work with bricks.Basically, this talent manifested itself in residential buildings designed by him, but not included in this collection. The "Cascade" is located inside the quarter's fabric near Tverskaya Street and resembles a spring, one of its sides resting against the end of a historic building. The building does not try to mimic the environment, but nevertheless observes the rules of the game that have developed here - in contrast to the modern business centers in the next quarter, hanging over the red line and twice the height of the surrounding buildings.

15. Building of the Courier Service

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Здание Фельдъегерской службы Фото © Константин Антипин
Здание Фельдъегерской службы Фото © Константин Антипин
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Architect: L.N. Pavlov, L.Yu. Gonchar, A.P. Semenov, O.A. Trubnikova

Completion of construction: 1984

Moscow, Solyanka street, 8

Since the late 1960s, Pavlov has created many redevelopment projects for the center of Moscow and its individual parts. One of them was Solyanka Street: the architect planned to leave only a few historical buildings, and to build new ones in place of others - quite in the spirit of modernism. He managed to realize part of this plan, in 1976 houses numbered 8 and 10 were demolished on Solyanka, and in their place a long building was erected, placed on round, orderless columns, which Pavlov used at that time in several of his projects, including the station mentioned above. metro station "Nagatinskaya".

16. Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki

Мемориальный музей В.И. Ленина в Горках Фото © Константин Антипин
Мемориальный музей В.И. Ленина в Горках Фото © Константин Антипин
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    1/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    5/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    6/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    7/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    8/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    9/9 Memorial Museum of V.I. Lenin in Gorki Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Architects: L.N. Pavlov, L.Yu. Potter

Engineers: L.A. Muromtsev, N.N. Arkhangelsk

Sculptor: I.D. Brodsky

Design: 1974-1980

Completion of construction: 1987

Gorki Leninskiye, Centralnaya street, building 1

Tatlin's ideal cube symbolized death. For the first time, Pavlov resorted to this figure when creating a monument on the grave of Ivan Leonidov, who died in 1959. A decade later, he used a composition of 19 different-scale cubes in the competition project of the Museum of V.I. Lenin on Volkhonka. And now, after another ten years, having reduced the number of cubes and leveled their scales, Pavlov said: "At the end of my life, I built the Parthenon." Using the motives of ancient Russian and ancient Egyptian temple architecture, Pavlov built a memorial church, which became a symbolic tombstone for the long-dead ideas of "Leninism". Four years after its opening, the Soviet Union collapsed. [Photo essay by Konstantin Antipin about this building can be viewed here - approx. Archi.ru].

17. New building of the Historical Library

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    1/4 New building of the Historical Library Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    2/4 New building of the Historical Library Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    3/4 New building of the Historical Library Photo © Konstantin Antipin

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    4/4 New building of the Historical Library Photo © Konstantin Antipin

Completion of construction: 1988

Moscow, Starosadsky lane, 9, building 3

The last project implemented during the life of the author is again in the center of Moscow. The new building of the public historical library, and in fact - the expansion and creation of a new facade of the building, built in 1901 for the school of the society of clerks. The portal of the main entrance evokes associations with the ground pavilion of the "Red Gate" by Ladovsky, only brought by Pavlov to his beloved square shape. And the rhythmic row of narrow loophole windows from a distance resembles folds of fabric, indicating that the new facade is just a screen.

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The change in architectural styles in Pavlov's work has always been as soft and smooth as possible - not because of the inertia of his views, but because of their eternal relevance. Pavlov had his own style, but it is reflected not in the monotony of the architecture of many of his buildings, but in the way they were designed. Therefore, one so often wants to exclaim, considering his work: "And this is Pavlov too ?!" - during his long career in Moscow alone, according to the project of the Master, more than fifty buildings of a very different orientation were erected. This August marks the 110th anniversary of the architect's birthday.

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